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Dating former student

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But why is it such a big deal when a prof becomes involved with a student who will never be his student again?Especially if they are both single and in and around the same age? I like my professor (used to be professor ) a lot, and I get the feeling he likes me.I don’t mind as much that he might turn me down since I’m no longer his student. Unfortunately, as in the case of “Dating Glory,” the readership of most blogs prove to be as unequipped to deal with these questions as the blogger, resulting in a consensus answer based on rationalizations, ethical fallacies and misconceptions.The original post, for example, states that “Lawyers date their clients all the time.” In fact, they don’t, and when they do, they are probably violating their ethics rules, which prohibit lawyers from dealings with clients that interfere with independent judgment and create conflicts of interest. On “Dating Glory,’ one commenter offered genuine insight.He spends a lot of time talking with me in his office and he often looks at me in ways that makes me think he does like me.I want to ask him for coffee but haven’t because I’ve heard this might jeopardize his job. Lawyers date their clients all the time.” It is good and responsible for websites, whatever their topic, to raise ethical issues for discussion.

Police found Bustamante dead of an apparently self-inflicted gunshot wound after an extended standoff with law enforcement officers.

The statement also implies a similarity that doesn’t exist, for the professor-student relationship’s duties and expectations are very different from those of attorneys and clients. “Professor X” correctly pointed out that professors were obligated to maintain a position of authority, objectivity and judgment as mentors and teachers of the whole student body, and had a duty to their schools not to allow their trustworthiness to be undermined by having intimate relationships among the same group that they were supposed to be supervising and advising. The created when a supervisor/manager/leader indulges in intimate relations with someone over whom they have authority, status and power—and every professor has authority over every student, in class or out— undermines the institution and the profession, by sending the false message that such relationships are standard, approved, and implicitly desirable in the culture where they occur.

Dating a student is a professional breach of trust, and one that adversely effects the integrity of the entire educational institution. As Professor X notes, a professor has a potential teacher-student relationship with students at a university, not just those in his or her classes.

Other relationships between faculty members and the students they teach have recently made headlines in Colorado, where the university is investigating a professor accused of having an amorous relationship with a graduate student who worked for him and not notifying his superiors, and North Carolina, where a faculty member resigned after it came to light that he had been having conversations of a sexual nature with an undergraduate student over an instant messaging service.“In my experience, this is not a rare occurrence, particularly at the graduate student level,” says Richard Carlson, a professor or labor and employment law at the South Texas College of Law, who has written on the subject of faculty-student relationships.

“It’s much more common than it should be.”Despite policies put in place at colleges and universities during the past decade that prohibit relationships between professors and the students they teach, and newer policies prohibiting all romantic and sexual relationships between instructors and undergraduates, professors on campuses across the country say that while such relationships are not common, they are more frequent than many expect."Sexual harassment has not disappeared from our campuses" and the "development of policies and programs has not eliminated the problem -- and perhaps never will," wrote Billie Wright Dziech, an English professor at the University of Cincinnati, and Linda Weiner, a former college administrator, in their book The Lecherous Professor.